Childfree Stories

The path to becoming childfree is a little different for everyone. Sometimes even the term itself seems up for grabs… what exactly is being childfree? Even so, one thing we can all agree on is that becoming childfree is a decision and that decision occurs as the outcome of some process. This process is different for every person because every person’s life is different. Politics, religion (or lack thereof), finances, relationships, geography, childhood experiences, culture, dreams, and ambitions can all play in the decision.

We wanted to learn about the diversity of our readers’ experiences with becoming – and being – childfree. Here, they weigh in.

Want to share your childfree story? Send us a 700-1500 word post along with a photo of yourself and we’ll be in touch!…Email Us!

Happy DINKs

Lisa

Lisa

by Lisa

It is a rainy Sunday afternoon in late fall. My husband and I are standing by our fireplace, each reading a book. Our two cats are lazily napping in “their” usual spots. The only sound in the house is the fireplace fan and the swish of a page turned every few minutes. And the occasional mid-dream cat noise. There is a deliberate sound missing – one that more households include than not, and a controversial and sensitive topic to many – the sound of children.

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Deciding to Remain Childfree

Stefani

Stefani

by Stefani

A few months ago, a decisive shift occurred in my thinking that gave me a good jolt. After six years of having looked forward to becoming a caring and all-out stimulating and dynamic mother at some indeterminate point in the near future, I suddenly realised that this wasn’t the only possible narrative for my life. I had swallowed the motherhood mandate hook, line, and sinker and I had never given myself the space and time to question whether I really, really want children.

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Out of the Void

El McGillivray

El McGillivray

by El

I had roughly known the answer before even asking, but I figured it wouldn’t harm to see what she’d say.  This nurse was a new face at my GP surgery, and I was there for a routine Pill check-up and a chat about “lady things” anyway.  It was worth a shot.

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How To Decide When You Can’t Decide

Emma

Emma

by Emma

OK so I’m THE worst decision maker on the planet. I’m a hot mess, I don’t mind admitting it. At times, the stress of just choosing the right outfit has had me in fits of tears, and expensive tickets to events have been thrown in the trash. My usual behaviour when ordering at a restaurant or takeaway food has famously been dubbed the “Emma Buffet” at home because I can never decide what the hell I want and end up ordering two or three different things, only to eat almost none of it. And that was from way before I even had a doggy for all the doggy bags.

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I think it all began when I was a kid…

by Claudia

Image - Claudia Carletti

Claudia Carletti

I think it all began when I was a kid.

I really hated dolls. They frightened me. I wanted to play with cars and my garage.

I am thankful my mom never forced me to play with dolls.

I received some dolls and hid them in a box.

Then when I was growing up, my cousins came along, and I never felt the urge to take them in my arms… I was afraid of babies!

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The Road Not Taken

Image - Childfree blogger Elizabeth Barton

Elizabeth Barton

by Elizabeth

Not long ago, I visited my doctor for a routine checkup. I was seeing this particular doctor for the first time (the one I had been seeing previously had left the practice). As we discussed my health and history, the conversation turned to contraception. “You have not had children, correct?” she said, glancing down at my file.

“That’s right.”

“Is having kids something you want to do in the future?” she asked.

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No Grand Epiphany

Sarah & her partner Ryan dressed as Carl & Ellie from Up.

Sarah & her partner Ryan dressed as Carl & Ellie from Up.

by Sarah

I grew up as an only child with “old” parents (my mom was 39 when she had me). People frequently mistook my father for my grandfather (and this horribly offended me as a child). I would beg my parents to take me to Wendy’s, because Wendy’s had these framed posters of kids to adopt. In retrospect, this seems incredibly dangerous and weird. But, I really wanted a sibling. I also really wanted a horse. Luckily, my best friend was also an only child and she had a horse.

Later, when it was clear that I would have no siblings (and no horse) I decided, “I want to adopt three kids someday.” That was in high school. Of course, I had novrealistic concept of adopting or raising three children.

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I Didn’t Have a Good Childhood…

Pete

Pete

by Pete

I didn’t have a good childhood growing up.  It wasn’t as bad as many, but it wasn’t a good one. My father was a verbally abusive alcoholic. He was extremely manipulative, and my brother and I were often used as leverage against my mother to keep her compliant. As time went on and we grew older, the situation grew worse.  My parents finally divorced, but by that time I was already in college and had moved out of the house.

As an adult, I had never particularly wanted children. I had never completely ruled out the possibility, but as time went on and years passed, I became more certain that parenthood wasn’t for me. I dated a single mom in my early 20′s and saw how much work it really was.  I decided I wasn’t interested in the responsibility, I didn’t see the up side to having a child of my own. I didn’t want to have to deal with screaming toddlers and dirty diapers. And I certainly didn’t want to be in a situation where my children were used as leverage against me, as was so often the case when I was growing up.

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Childfree and a Kid Person? It’s Possible!

Courtney and her husband loving life

Courtney and her husband loving life

by Courtney

I love kids. I have always loved kids. I am not repulsed by dirty diapers, vomit, mud, or jam hands. It is nigh impossible to gross me out. I like science museums, amusement parks, fairs, and I don’t even mind the occasional skating lesson. Kids are (mostly) adorable, and fill me with joy. I don’t want kids. I know what you’re thinking: “wait..what?! Didn’t you just get done telling us how much you love kids?!” I did, and I do. That doesn’t mean I feel the need to make one, own one, or pay for one. Let alone two or three.

When we got married my husband and I assumed we would one day have children. When we were first together I was always asked (by strangers) when we were having children.  I would inevitably laugh and say, Oh give me 10 years! I got to the point where I had been using the “10 years” line for about 5 years, and I looked at my husband and asked if he actually wanted kids.  His answer? No..not really. It was like a light bulb went off. We don’t HAVE to have children. I am not required to procreate.

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Permanent Birth Control

Star LaBranche

Star LaBranche

by Star LaBranche

I was sterilized at the age of 21. I had started researching permanent birth control methods at age 16. By the time I was 19, I was certain that I didn’t ever want to have a baby. One thing that gave me pause during my research was the idea of tubal ligation being a serious, invasive, not completely effective procedure that could lead to early menopause and other serious complications. But then I discovered the Essure procedure and everything fell into place.

Essure was a relatively new procedure when I first found out about it. The way it works is to insert a nickle and titanium coil into each fallopian tube. Scar tissue builds up around the coils and prevents eggs from making the journey from the ovaries to the uterus. The eggs are reabsorbed into the body and the woman continues to menstruate normally. The success rate with this procedure is incredibly high and the changes of complications are very low.

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Why I Don’t Want to be a Mom…or an Astronaut

Rachel celebrating her 5 year anniversary.

Rachel celebrating her 5 year anniversary.

by Rachel

Growing up with my older sister, we loved to play with three things: Barbies, Legos and these huge “Dress Up” bins my mom had filled with old clothes, hats and shoes. But Barbie was my favorite and she had this amazing custom house that my dad had built her. She also had a hot pink convertible, a sexy boyfriend and a new job every day depending on what I thought her current skill set was.

But one year when I was around seven or eight, a “new” babydoll came out. This “new” babydoll had eyes that opened and closed, she cried, ate real food, and she would wet and crap her diaper – every girl’s dream. So I asked for her for Christmas along with a real baby crib to put her in. My parents never pushed Santa Claus and every year they would tell us where the Christmas gifts were being stored. It was their belief that if we wanted to peek at our gifts and ruin Christmas morning, that was up to us. Our parents were older when they had us, if that is not obvious yet…

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Married with Luggage. Without Kids.

B&W at coast (1)

Betsy & Warren Talbot

Q & A with Betsy and Warren Talbot

We’re are a 40-something couple who decided back in 2008 after serious illnesses struck close to home that life was too short to put off our dreams. After a night of one too many margaritas with good friends, we asked the question that would change everything for us: “What would you change about your life right now if you knew you wouldn’t make it to 40?” We were 37 at the time, and we knew we’d regret not living out our retirement dream of traveling the world. So we decided to fast-forward it by about 25 years. It took us two years to save enough money and get rid of all our belongings to travel the world just before we turned 40. Since 2010 we’ve been making our way around the globe, sharing our experience in creating a life and relationship we love through our books, website, and weekly podcast. We now live part-time in Spain.

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Gay and Childfree

Ramona & Frances visit Chicago Cloud Gate

Ramona & Frances visit Chicago Cloud Gate

by Ramona & Frances

In our experience, we have it easy compared to straight folks when it comes to societal pressures to have kids. No one in our families ever asked us when we were going to have children with the assumption that we would. Neither did our friends, to be honest. Could it be that our reputation for being carefree and spontaneous among our friends and family signaled to people that the childfree life was for us? I doubt that. In fact, many off-hand comments reminded us that we were not expected to have children. For example, my partner has a single sibling who once said to us, “Well, since you aren’t going to have kids, it’s all up to me.” This is without any preceding questions or conversation about having children. In fact, at that point we were quietly beginning what would become the very lengthy process of trying to conceive. It served as a reminder that having children wasn’t what the people around us expected us to do. Not even did us getting legally married ten years ago here in Canada add to the pressure to have kids.

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South African & Childfree

by Wallis

Wallis & Ken on a a recent trip to France

Wallis & Ken on a a recent trip to France

I am nearly 31 and my partner is 33. Since I was a girl I was never into having baby toys and silly baby accessories. Growing up I found myself much more drawn to animals than to babies. I have always said that I don’t want kids… and taken a fair amount of flack for it. I have a lot of experience with the standard responses of “you will change your mind when you get older” or “when you have your own you will understand”.

Several years ago I met the man of my dreams. He was recently out of a very serious relationship and was for the first time questioning the purpose of mindlessly getting married, having kids and living the typical life of so many. He had always kind of accepted that kids would be part of his life without really spending time thinking about why he would want them and questioning if he wants them at all.

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Childfree in New Zealand, Part 2

Kiwi Disambiguation

Kiwi Disambiguation

by Lisa Taylor (a told by Daniel)

Daniel is a male from New Zealand. He is 26 years old. He is an elder brother to one sibling. His brother is 6 years younger, and luckily for Daniel their mum did all the “baby chores”. Daniel did have to do some babysitting for his brother.

In high school, Daniel knew he had three life path options. His first was the usual, find a partner and have children (or not). His second path was to become a scientific genius in some hardcore career; he would have no time for romance, because he’d be working so many hours in some kind of lab! Daniel’s third path was the one he avoided but it did seem like an only option at one stage: to be forever alone.

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Childfree in New Zealand, Part 1

Lisa Taylor calls Wellington, New Zealand home

Lisa Taylor calls Wellington, New Zealand home

by Lisa Taylor

My name is Lisa Taylor. I am now 25 years old. When I was was younger, okay 16 I was dating a guy who had a heart condition. It was so rare he was one of only 2 people in the world who had it. He was also the longest surviving person to have it. In 2006 he died suddenly from his condition.  During that time I had just turned 18 and was thinking about motherhood and what the future would bring for me. While I was mourning for his loss I did wish (so badly) that I was pregnant with his child. Alas it was not meant to be and I remain nullipara to this day.

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Childfree from 1974 to 2013 – Marcia Drut-Davis

Picture of Marcia Drut-Davis, Author "Confessions of a Childfree Woman: A Life Spent Swimming Against the Mainstream"

Marcia Drut-Davis, Author “Confessions of a Childfree Woman: A Life Spent Swimming Against the Mainstream”

by Marcia Drut-Davis

In 1974, I “came out” telling the world I never wanted to have or raise children. It was the year I felt empowered by “The Baby Trap” by Ellen Peck. That book told me I wasn’t a freak of nature. It changed being “less” to being free of children. It was the year I was interviewed on 60 Minutes and lost my job because of that exposure. It was the first time I heard the word, “pronatalism” and started to understand what it meant.

I never knew how much people felt threatened by those of us who simply never wanted to have or raise children. What business was it of others? Why was it so awful?  Who would I hurt by this personal choice except possibly my mom and in-laws who wanted a grandchild.

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Childfree – A Latina’s Perspective

Photo of Gloria de Leon

Gloria de Leon

by Gloria de Leon

As a mature Latina of Mexican American descent, I recognized my life would be defined by choice or circumstance.  Given the history of traditional roles and predictable demographics, my path was limited.  Every one of my peers was headed towards the same direction. I found myself surrounded by girlfriends engaged by senior year in high school.  My thought was, “I’m not ready to get married!”

Meantime, my four older sisters married right out of high school and became mothers by the time they were 21.  I babysat, changed diapers, spent quality time loving all my nieces and nephews.

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From Childless to Childfree

Rachel & her husband

Rachel & her husband

by Rachel

Hi! I’m Rachel and I am childfree after infertility.

My husband and I tried for almost three years to have kids. We had all the tests done, I took my temperature every morning to determine my fertility on any given day, I took the fertility meds (even my husband took fertility meds for a while), but we never got pregnant.

Childless also implies that I didn’t make a choice. I did. I made a huge and very difficult choice. I put aside my dream of being a mother and decided that my happiness and health needed to come first. I recognized that my dreams needed to change.

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Childfree Decision – A Guy’s Perspective

You know what really grinds my gears? Accidental 18 year commitments

Meme courtesy of http://www.quickmeme.com/

by Lance Blackstone

Growing up I knew that I’d have kids of my own. The path was obvious: grow up, date, get married, have kids and be a dad. Preferably in that order. No steps optional.

This is how it works.

I’ve occasionally been wrong, but for the sake of this post I’ll assume that many guys have a similar mindset.

I first actively questioned this obvious path around nine when I realized kids are a LOT of work. I have first hand experience of this. You see I have four siblings, all older sisters. Yes, four older sisters; thanks for the sympathy.

When I was nine, two (only two!) of my sisters still lived at home with yours truly. We were an absolute handful, or more truthfully, I was an angel with two wicked, older step sisters.

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